MOFET ITEC - Dealing with School Violence: The Effect of School Violence Prevention Training on Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Dealing with Violent Events

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Do They Really Need to Raise Their Hands? Challenging a Traditional Social Norm in a Second Grade Mathematics Classroom
Dealing with School Violence: The Effect of School Violence Prevention Training on Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Dealing with Violent Events
Problem-Based Learning in the Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Grades: Assessment of Students' Perceptions
Section: Instruction in Teacher Training
Dealing with School Violence: The Effect of School Violence Prevention Training on Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Dealing with Violent Events
Country or Region: Israel
November 2009   |   Type: Abstract
“This article was published in Teaching and Teacher Education, Vol 25 number 8, Author: Revital Sela-Shayovitz, "Dealing with School Violence: The Effect of School Violence Prevention Training on Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Dealing with Violent Events", Pages 1061-1066, Copyright Elsevier (November 2009)”.

This study deals with the relationship between school violence prevention training and teachers' perceived self-efficacy in handling violent events.

Three indicators were used to examine teachers' self-efficacy: personal teaching efficacy (PTE), teachers' efficacy in the school as an organisation (TESO), and teachers' outcome efficacy (TOE).
Data were obtained from an anonymous questionnaire administered to 147 teachers.

The findings revealed a significant correlation between participation in school violence training and TOE, whereas training did not correlate significantly with PTE and TESO. Teachers at elementary and junior high schools reported higher levels of TOE in dealing with violence than high school teachers.
A significant relationship was found between teachers who reported receiving high levels of support from the school and TOE in dealing with violence.
Comments (1):
May 5, 2012     heyam (jordan) wrote:
please,i want the full absract +the place where study was done
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