MOFET ITEC - Search Results

ITEC Home The MOFET Institute Home Page Home Page
Trends in Teacher Education Assessment & Evaluation Beginning Teachers Instruction in Teacher Training Professional Development ICT & Teaching Research Methods Multiculturalism & Diversity Preservice Teachers Theories & Approaches Teacher Education Programs Mentoring & Supervision Teacher Educators

Search Results for 'USA'
823 items found 1 / 83 Go to page 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1   |   From section Mentoring & Supervision
Comparing Alternative Voices in the Academy: Navigating the Complexity of Mentoring Relationships from Divergent Ethnic Backgrounds
The authors explored the mentoring experiences of two women in higher education who are working at different levels within a research institution. Traditional mentoring relationships which pair graduate students or junior faculty with a single mentor matched by gender, race, research interest have not produced unilateral success for dedicated protégés. Alternatives to traditional mentoring have produced positive results for participants through supports which better match the needs of women and minority graduate students and junior faculty. Yet, few organized efforts to develop successful alternative approaches to traditional mentoring exist.
Publication Year: 2014    |    Updated in ITEC: March 23, 2017
2   |   From section Theories & Approaches
Building Adaptive Expertise and Practice-Based Evidence: Applying the Implementation Stages Framework to Special Education Teacher Preparation
In this paper, the authors describe a capstone project that meets these needs and prepares pre-service special educators for their role in the development of practice-based evidence. These aims align well with the Council for Exceptional Children’s Professional Standards. To describe this project and how it meets these aims, the authors used the Implementation Stages framework. Outcomes reflect an increase in pre-service special educators’ ability to research and design usable interventions based on evidence-based practices.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: March 19, 2017
3   |   From section Mentoring & Supervision
Leadership Development through Mentoring in Higher Education: A Collaborative Autoethnography of Leaders of Color
In this collaborative autoethnography, the authors explored how 14 faculty and administrators of color, identified as emerging leaders within their campus context, experienced mentoring and how these experiences have impacted their leadership development and sense of well-being in the higher education context. In this study, the authors provided evidence of the importance of supportive, developmental professional relationships in the lives of emerging leaders in higher education, especially among people of color. Leaders of color in faith-based higher education identified such relationships, involving psychosocial and career development functions, as fairly limited within their institutional settings.
Publication Year: 2014    |    Updated in ITEC: March 19, 2017
4   |   From section Preservice Teachers
“Less Afraid to Have Them in My Classroom”: Understanding Pre-Service General Educators’ Perceptions about Inclusion
The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to understand the perceptions of pre-service general educators about the inclusion of students with disabilities (SWDs) prior to and at the end of a required course on integrating exceptional students; and (2) to determine if there was a difference by program. The authors conclude that infusion of special education content across the curriculum is one recommendation for enhancing and understanding of SWDs, but the quantity and quality of content in this area will vary based on the background knowledge of each instructor. The authors suggest that teacher educators can only strengthen programs by building relationships across disciplines. Instructional strategies and accommodations that seamlessly grant students with disabilities maximum access to the general education curriculum should naturally be infused in methods courses.
Publication Year: 2011    |    Updated in ITEC: March 16, 2017
5   |   From section Theories & Approaches
How Can Schools of Education Help to Build Educators’ Capacity to Use Data? A Systemic View of the Issue
The objective of this article is to understand what schools of education are doing to prepare teachers to use data in their practice. The study examined the extent to which schools of education teach stand-alone courses on data-driven decision making or integrate data use concepts into existing courses. It also examined state licensure and certification requirements to determine if and how data use is included in documentation. The analyses yield several key findings. First, schools of education report that they are teaching stand-alone courses on data-driven decision making. The syllabus analyses provide a deeper examination into what actually is being taught in a subset of the courses. The licensure analyses provide a perspective on how education may view data literacy.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: March 16, 2017
6   |   From section Beginning Teachers
Teacher Turnover in High-Poverty Schools: What We know and Can Do
This paper presents an alternative explanation for turnover—one grounded in organizational theory and substantiated by an emerging line of research. In doing so, it reframes the debate over what fuels high rates of teacher turnover in high-poverty schools and provides advice for policy makers and practitioners. This paper reviews six studies analyzing turnover as a function of school context rather than as a function of student demographics. The review suggests that teachers who leave high-poverty schools are not fleeing their students. Rather, they are fleeing the poor working conditions that make it difficult for them to teach and for their students to learn. The working conditions that teachers prize most include school leadership, collegial relationships, and elements of school culture.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: March 16, 2017
7   |   From section ICT & Teaching
“So We Have to Teach Them or What?”: Introducing Preservice Teachers to the Figured Worlds of Urban Youth Through Digital Conversation
Using a figured world framework, the authors explore how social interaction made possible through digital tools shaped the actions and identities of 16 preservice teachers. The findings reveal that providing preservice teachers with virtual access to urban youth’s figured worlds allowed the preservice teachers to better understand the cultural artifacts of these students’ worlds. In doing so, they were forced to acknowledge the importance of maintaining the belief that all students, including those from urban backgrounds, can and want to engage in rigorous learning.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: March 19, 2017
8   |   From section Preservice Teachers
Delving Deeper Into the Construct of Preservice Teacher Beliefs About Reading Instruction for Students With Disabilities
The goal of this study was to complete an in-depth examination of the construct of teacher beliefs by investigating preservice teachers’ beliefs about reading instruction for students with disabilities. Results indicate that preservice teachers’ beliefs systems are complex, made up of enduring, deeply rooted expressed beliefs as well as beliefs-in-use that are highly dependent on discipline-specific working knowledge.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: March 8, 2017
9   |   From section Instruction in Teacher Training
Field-based Teacher Education in Literacy: Preparing Teachers in Real Classroom Contexts
This article is based on our experiences in designing and implementing an integrated literacy methods course in a field-based teacher education program. The authors describe issues involved in helping preservice teachers learn to differentiate literacy instruction for diverse learners in urban schools and describe how they use Grossman’s framework of representation, decomposition, and approximation of practice to connect theory and practice.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: March 2, 2017
10   |   From section Teacher Education Programs
Learning to Teach and Teaching to Learn: Supporting the Development of New Social Justice Educators
This study explored the role that participating in a critical inquiry project (CIP) played on the development of new educators who aspire to teach from a social justice perspective. The study also examined how relationships between the first- and second-year teacher participants shaped their development as social justice educators, learners, and leaders. The findings revealed that members were able to reflect on their journey of developing as social justice educators, seeing where they started and where they were still heading. This ongoing reflection and their own perception of their development kept them committed to the group and to the goal of social justice education (SJE). The findings also showed how members learned to have each other’s backs. A third result was that CIP gave members opportunities to teach SJE to others. Finally, members felt a tremendous sense of accomplishment.
Publication Year: 2011    |    Updated in ITEC: March 2, 2017
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10



Show