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Search Results for 'United Kingdom'
183 items found 1 / 19 Go to page 
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1   |   From section Instruction in Teacher Training
Peer Learning for Change in Higher Education
This article proposes a learning development (LD) perspective to peer learning in higher education. This article focuses on the PAL scheme, which was introduced at Plymouth University in 2011 (PALS@Plymouth) with the specific intention to promote a LD perspective. The author conducted a small scale study based on informal, semi-structured interviews seeking the views of PALS leaders about how their involvement in the scheme might serve to focus attention not just on individual student needs but on to problems arising from academic practices more broadly. The interviews with the PALS leaders revealed the value of learning from peers. The author suggests that student-led sessions could offer opportunities to assimilate and gain confidence in academic discourse, as advocated by PALS leaders in this study.
Publication Year: 2014    |    Updated in ITEC: October 15, 2017
2   |   From section Professional Development
Professional Development Seen as Employment Capital
This study explores human resource (HR) practitioners’ understandings of professional development as a form of capital for job progress. The findings of HR practitioners have implications for educationalists in revealing how professional learning supports practitioners’ growth in capability and self-efficacy of benefit to the individual, organisation and society. Educators need to articulate the longer-term effects of nurturing capacities for collective practice and greater self-knowledge, to contribute to societal interests.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in ITEC: September 27, 2017
3   |   From section Multiculturalism & Diversity
Joining the Dots between Teacher Education and Widening Participation in Higher Education
This article examines the barriers to accessing teacher education for students from excluded groups both theoretically and in practice – using two examples: one in the North West of England and the second in Queensland, Australia. The findings reveal that expanding the diversity of the teaching profession is an important way in which higher education (HE) institutions can contribute to the overall goal of widening participation in HE as schools are fundamental to shaping who participates in HE. As the gap between the rich and poor widens, the authors argue that it is time for a change in the way potential student teachers access HE and the curriculum if we are to address the needs of under-represented learners.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in ITEC: September 13, 2017
4   |   From section Theories & Approaches
Teachers’ Engagement with Research Texts: Beyond Instrumental, Conceptual or Strategic Use
Author Tim Cain
This article analyses data from two studies in English comprehensive schools, in which teachers were given research reports about teaching gifted and talented students, and supported over a 12-month period, to incorporate findings into practitioner research projects of their own devising. The findings revealed that the teachers used research in instrumental and strategic ways, but only very occasionally. More frequently, their use of research was conceptual. Within this category, research influenced what teachers thought about, and how they thought.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: September 5, 2017
5   |   From section Theories & Approaches
Teachers and School Research Practices: The Gaps between the Values and Practices of Teachers
This article explores the research practices used by teachers and their schools. It also investigates the value that teachers attribute to those research practices. In conclusion, this study reveals that teachers are interested in research and research practices and value these things even if they are unable to engage with them in their daily work.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: September 5, 2017
6   |   From section Beginning Teachers
How Prepared Do Newly-Qualified Teachers Feel? Differences between Routes and Settings?
This article addresses the issue: whether there are key differences in the type and quality of preparation that newly-qualified teachers (NQTs) receive. The findings reveal that, in general, there is a high level of reported overall satisfaction with induction of teacher education (ITE), and that this is true across all routes. There was less satisfaction with specific features such as preparation for handling special needs, behaviour and reading. The average levels of satisfaction for NQTs are largely un-stratified by sex, disability, age and ethnicity. Adding all available variables, including those aggregated and examined as interactions with others, can explain only around 20% of the unexplained variation even in the strongest models.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in ITEC: July 9, 2017
7   |   From section Professional Development
The Professional Developmental Needs of Higher Education-based Teacher Educators: An International Comparative Needs Analysis
The purpose of this international and comparative study is to examine what professional learning activities teacher educators value and what factors affect their participation in these activities. The findings reveal that two types of teacher educators’ professional learning needs arise from the data: (i) those involving the development of educational capacities related to their day-to-day remit as a teacher educator and (ii) those required for progressing an academic career, with research and writing skills being the most salient. Furthermore, this study emphasises the ways in which teacher educators, as both teachers and researchers, want to be part of a collaborative community where they can feel supported, listened to, and share their practices and experiences.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in ITEC: June 25, 2017
8   |   From section ICT & Teaching
#FramingFragmentsofThought - Exploring the Role of Social Media, in Developing Emergent Reflective Practitioners in Initial Teacher Training
This article explores Initial Teacher Training (ITT) undergraduates’ propensity to reflect upon professional practice through utilising social media networks [specifically Twitter] as a professional learning and/or teaching tool. It explores whether collaboration in the social network [acting as a community of practice] enables reflective discourse and analysis of professional practice with emergent practitioners in ITT and whether this instigates pedagogical change.
Publication Year: 2017    |    Updated in ITEC: October 1, 2017
9   |   From section Beginning Teachers
Relationships and Early Career Teacher Resilience: A Role for School Principals
This article uses two narrative portraits of early career teachers to examine the central role of principals in influencing teachers’ feelings of personal and professional well-being, with both negative and positive effects reported. The portraits of two female early career teachers illustrate the vulnerability of many beginning teachers, whose work conditions are dependent on the goodwill and discretion of colleagues and leaders. In both stories, the principals played a central role in terms of the amount and kind of personal support they gave and their leadership in developing the overall school culture.
Publication Year: 2012    |    Updated in ITEC: May 15, 2017
10   |   From section Trends in Teacher Education
Teacher Education Futures: Today’s Trends, Tomorrow’s Expectations
This article investigate teacher educators’ views of current trends and their consequences for teacher education futures. The findings reported give voice to the expert participants. The data were then used to develop the discussion which comprised two scenarios. Two major fields of change are identified here and these are used to imagine different futures through the use of a two-dimensional model. The two major fields identified from the discussion are a continuum on location of teacher education, from school based to university based, and a continuum on autonomy and regulation, ranging from high government regulation to self-regulation by the profession.
Publication Year: 2013    |    Updated in ITEC: May 8, 2017
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