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Search Results for 'Mentoring' (Keyword)
132 items found 1 / 14 Go to page 
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1   |   From section Beginning Teachers
Preparing Teachers for Professional Learning: Is There a Future for Teacher Education in New Teacher Induction?
In this article, the authors explore which factors support or constrain professional learning during initial years of teaching. The findings reveal that novice teachers generally experienced a positive welcome into their schools and the support of well-meaning colleagues. The majority of the new teachers perceive their initial induction to be useful and, in particular, they credit mentoring with assisting their transition into teaching. The authors conclude that providing opportunities for the new teacher to observe other teachers and to be observed by a mentor emerged as central tasks of learning to teach for these new teachers.
Publication Year: 2013    |    Updated in ITEC: November 12, 2017
2   |   From section Mentoring & Supervision
Undergraduate Research Mentoring: Obstacles and Opportunities
This article describes the present gap between aspiration and effective execution of well-mentored undergraduate research, scholarship, and creative work (URSCW), including the most prevalent obstacles (e.g. institutional, departmental, individual) to undergraduate mentoring. The authors conclude that this research shows that the experience, which students engaged in URSCW, has the potential to provide deep and lasting high-impact learning. This potential can only be fully realized when the institutions commit to the belief that high-quality mentoring matters, for students, faculty, and their institutions.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: October 26, 2017
3   |   From section Teacher Educators
Embracing Institutional Authority: The Emerging Identity of a Novice Teacher Educator
This article examines how various aspects of the first author's identity, i.e. natural, institutional, discursive, and affinity, intersected during his first semester as teacher educator. The experience of the novice teacher educator revealed that his preoccupation with students’ perceptions of who he was as a teacher and as an individual prevented any substantial consideration of the kind of teacher educator he wanted to be. Given the insecurities often tied to this new professional identity, the authors argue that it is important to consider and negotiate the pedagogical and professional development of first-time teacher educators.The authors believe that an emphasis on community should be promoted in order to enhance the possibilities of teacher education. They say that novice teacher educators should be surrounded by like-minded individuals who function as both critical friends and a supportive community.
Publication Year: 2014    |    Updated in ITEC: October 15, 2017
4   |   From section Beginning Teachers
Novice Teachers as ‘Invisible’ Learners
This study focuses on the way novice teachers, who are part of a one-year postgraduate diploma in post-primary teaching, have opted to negotiate their status as school teachers. In particular, it asks why novice teachers prefer to hide as they scramble to learn how to teach. Findings suggest that without quality mentoring support, our pre-service teachers prefer to become ‘invisible’ as learners. The authors identified three pre-professional stances: fragile, robust and competitive. The key finding is that none of these pre-professional stances mitigate pre-service students’ lack of negotiating power.
Publication Year: 2012    |    Updated in ITEC: September 7, 2017
5   |   From section Mentoring & Supervision
Construction of Professional Knowledge of Teaching: Collaboration between Experienced Primary School Teachers and University Teachers through an Online Mentoring Programme
This article presents a research and intervention methodology developed in an online continuing teacher education programme. In particular, this article analyses the mentors' professional development processes and the contributions to professional development of their participation in the research group responsible for Online Mentoring Programme (OMP). This programme collaborative research involved an articulated dialogue between researchers and teachers aimed at constructing new knowledge and searching for solutions to concrete practical everyday problems of the OMP. The data revealed that the mentors, in collaboration with the researchers, have been able to critically examine their work with the novice teachers, to develop, implement and evaluate interventions. This collaboration allow the mentors to promote both their own and the novice teachers’ teacher development and construction of new knowledge.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: September 5, 2017
6   |   From section Mentoring & Supervision
Examining the Benefits of a Faculty Technology Mentoring Program on Graduate Students' Professional Development
This study investigated the impact of a university-wide faculty technology mentoring (FTM) program on participating graduate students' professional development. The results reveal both how graduate students are rewarded by participating in such activities and valuable mentoring methods to develop graduate students' technical, academic, pedagogical, and professional skills.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in ITEC: August 9, 2017
7   |   From section Mentoring & Supervision
Benefits of Peer Mentoring to Mentors, Female Mentees and Higher Education Institutions
In this article, the authors describe a pilot mentoring program which includes the under-representation of female researchers in senior academic positions by supporting early career development for young academics at two faculties at a Danish university. The authors analyze the benefits of mentoring to postdoc female researchers’ career, to the mentees, and to the higher education institution. The implementation of the structured mentoring program demonstrates a level of institutional support that helped strengthen self-confidence and individual development, and provided access to experienced researchers’ knowledge about career planning and integration in the research environment.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in ITEC: August 9, 2017
8   |   From section Mentoring & Supervision
Educative Mentoring: How a Mentor Supported a Preservice Biology Teacher’s Pedagogical Content Knowledge Development
The purpose of this study is to describe the strategies used by a highly regarded, secondary biology mentor teacher to foster a preservice biology teacher’s pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). In this study, the mentoring was exclusively focused on beliefs about effective science teaching and how students’ learn science. The mentor teacher helped preservice teacher understand why he should teach in particular ways. The mentor also helped the mentee develop his topic-specific knowledge of students’ understanding of science by discussing common misconceptions revealed in students’ conversations and examination responses. She modeled ways for the mentee to access students’ misconceptions.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: July 6, 2017
9   |   From section Mentoring & Supervision
Mentoring 101: Advancing African-American Women Faculty and Doctoral Student Success in Predominantly White Institutions
This paper is purposed with operationalizing the concept of mentoring as a nuanced approach and attempt to promote the upward trajectories of African-American women in predominantly White institutions (PWIs). The authors struggled as African-American women to balance and decipher the various facets inherent in their respective roles – professor and doctoral student in a PWI – hence a mentor/mentee relationship emerged. This qualitative study explored the effectiveness of traditional and non-traditional mentoring functions for an African-American woman doctoral student aspiring for the professoriate, and the professional advancement of an African-American woman professor, who matriculate in the same PWI.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: April 4, 2017
10   |   From section Mentoring & Supervision
Leadership Development through Mentoring in Higher Education: A Collaborative Autoethnography of Leaders of Color
In this collaborative autoethnography, the authors explored how 14 faculty and administrators of color, identified as emerging leaders within their campus context, experienced mentoring and how these experiences have impacted their leadership development and sense of well-being in the higher education context. In this study, the authors provided evidence of the importance of supportive, developmental professional relationships in the lives of emerging leaders in higher education, especially among people of color. Leaders of color in faith-based higher education identified such relationships, involving psychosocial and career development functions, as fairly limited within their institutional settings.
Publication Year: 2014    |    Updated in ITEC: March 19, 2017
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