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Last update in this section: March 16, 2017
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Beginning Teachers
Teacher Turnover in High-Poverty Schools: What We know and Can Do
This paper presents an alternative explanation for turnover—one grounded in organizational theory and substantiated by an emerging line of research. In doing so, it reframes the debate over what fuels high rates of teacher turnover in high-poverty schools and provides advice for policy makers and practitioners. This paper reviews six studies analyzing turnover as a function of school context rather than as a function of student demographics. The review suggests that teachers who leave high-poverty schools are not fleeing their students. Rather, they are fleeing the poor working conditions that make it difficult for them to teach and for their students to learn. The working conditions that teachers prize most include school leadership, collegial relationships, and elements of school culture.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: March 16, 2017
Considering the Social Context of Schools: A Framework for Investigating New Teacher Induction
The goal of this paper is to provide a useful framework rooted in social capital theory to be utilized to guide future research and practice concerning novice teacher induction that includes broader attention to the social context within which teachers are situated. Specifically, the author expounds upon the elements of a school’s social context which impact teacher socialization, including: (1) social context, (2) characteristics of novices, mentors, and colleagues, (3) alignment, and (4) frequency and content of interactions. The author provides recommendations for future research and improved practice.
Publication Year: 2012    |    Updated in ITEC: February 14, 2017
“That’s My Job”: Comparing the Beliefs of More and Less Accomplished Special Educators Related to Their Roles and Responsibilities
This study aims to understand special education teachers’ beliefs regarding their roles and responsibilities. The goal of this study is also to determine how these beliefs differ among more and less accomplished teachers. In this study, the authors examine the interviews of special education teachers identified as either more or less accomplished based on the Reading in Special Education (RISE) observation instrument. Through qualitative coding of the data, several themes about beliefs revealed differences between the teachers. The more accomplished teachers discussed a need for instructional intensity and linked their roles and responsibilities to academic needs.
Publication Year: 2015    |    Updated in ITEC: January 30, 2017
Teacher Perspectives on their Alternative Fast-Track Induction
This study aimed to explore the professional challenges and concerns of 30 second career teachers (SCTs) participating in an alternative fast-track induction program during their first year of teaching. Additionally, the study investigated their perspectives of the institutional support provided to them. The results suggest that the challenges and concerns of SCTs trained through a fast-track program are essentially not dissimilar from novice teachers trained in traditional programs. Even though SCTs entered the profession with extensive life and work experience, they seemed to perceive the same mismatch experienced by other first-year teachers between what they had expected and what they actually encountered. Their main challenges and concerns centered on: classroom teaching, teacher–student relations, the extensive workload, and their emotional involvement.
Publication Year: 2016    |    Updated in ITEC: January 3, 2017
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